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Darwin’s Frogs in the Field

Our team has been busy working in the field.  Among our objectives, we want to visit historical localities for Darwin’s Frogs and determine if they are still there.  If we find frogs, we take skin swabs and see if amphibian chytrid fungus is present.

Darwin's Frogs with a combination of browns and tans in their pattern are the most common encounters.

Darwin's Frogs with a combination of browns and tans in their pattern are the most common encounters.

We have come across a number of green individuals but infrequently see a combinations of greens like this individual demonstrates.

We have come across a number of green individuals but infrequently see a combinations of greens like this individual demonstrates.

Our experiences have been that one shade of green in individual Darwin's Frogs, like this individual, is more common than frogs with two shades of green.

Our experiences have been that one shade of green in individual Darwin's Frogs, like this individual, is more common than frogs with two shades of green.

The length of the nose appendage differs between individuals.  The reasons for the nose appendage discrpancy may be from loss of parts of the appendage in some individuals or simply via natural variation.

The length of the nose appendage differs between individuals. The reasons for the nose appendage discrepancy may be from loss of parts of the appendage in some individuals or simply via natural variation.

The profile of Darwin's Frogs is truly unique.

The profile of Darwin's Frogs is truly unique.

Sometimes individuals are found without their nose appendage in tact.

Sometimes individuals are found without their nose appendage in tact.

The fleshy appendages on the "heels" of Darwin's Frogs are called calcars.

The fleshy appendages on the "heels" of Darwin's Frogs are called calcars.

Many Darwin's Frogs have several colors present in their pattern.

Many Darwin's Frogs have several colors present in their pattern.

The lower abdomen and undersides of the legs are often colored black and white.

The lower abdomen and undersides of the legs are often colored black and white.

It is not impossible to come across very young Darwin's Frogs in the field.  This is an example of a newly "coughed up" baby frog sitting on a finger tip.

It is not impossible to come across very young Darwin's Frogs in the field. This is an example of a newly "coughed up" baby frog sitting on a finger tip.

admin in Uncategorized on January 14 2010 » 2 comments
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  1. Jim says on June 08 2010 at 20:08:

    What special conditions are necessary to raise baby Darwin’s Frogs?

    Best,
    Jim

  2. admin says on June 08 2010 at 21:25:

    Hi Jim,

    We raise our baby frogs individually in small containers. We do this to make sure that each individual gets an appropriate amount of food. As the frogs get older, we begin to accommodate them in small groups. Our newly “born” frogs eat small invertebrates called collembola and aphids.

    Cheers & Thanks!!

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